Module 1: Food Systems Analysis

1. Introduction to Food Systems

2. Definition of a Food System

2.1. What is a Food System?
2.1.1. A systems perspective and systems modelling
2.1.2. Economy-wide models
2.1.3. Biophysical economics, farming systems, agro-ecosystems, and agribusiness systems
2.1.4. Systems dynamics
2.2. Why a systems approach to food?
2.2.1. Linear approaches to food systems analysis
2.2.2. What linear approaches conceal
2.2.3. The changing character of food systems
2.2.4. What is an ideal food system?
2.2.5. Diversity of food systems

3. An overview of the current food system: problems, policy challenges, questions and solutions

3.1. Problems
3.2. Policy challenges
3.3. Looking for solutions to problems
3.3.1. Price
3.3.2. The food chain
3.3.3. Consumers

4. Conclusion: Future trends and issues in food systems

5. References

Module 2: Trade Liberalization and Food Governance

1. Introduction

2. Trade Liberalization

2.1. Introduction
2.2. Background to contemporary trade liberalization
2.3. Organization of the WTO
2.4. The stormy voyage of the WTO: the Ministerial meetings
2.4.1. First Ministerial Conference-Singapore
2.4.2. Second Ministerial Conference-Geneva
2.4.3. Third Ministerial Conference-Seattle
2.4.4. Fourth Ministerial Conference-Doha
2.4.5. Fifth Ministerial Conference-Cancun
2.4.6. Sixth Ministerial Conference-Hong Kong
2.5. Decision-making and negotiating processes at the WTO
2.6. Conclusion
2.7. Notes on readings

3. Theoretical formulation

3.1. Introduction
3.2. Power, Structure and People
3.3. Power in structures
3.4. Structural change and hegemonic mediation
3.5. Mobilization of social movements' elements in social mobilization
3.6. Application of the formulation to trade liberalization
3.7. Conclusion
3.8. Notes on readings

4. Neoliberalism and neoliberal social formations

4.1. Introduction
4.2. From liberal to neoliberal social formations
4.3. Organization and reorganization in neoliberal social formations
4.4. Conclusion
4.5. Notes on readings

5. The State

5.1. Introduction
5.2. The neoliberalization of the state
5.3. The opening of the state and the organization of administration
5.4. The state and management of consent
5.5. Conclusion
5.6. Notes on readings

6. Food Governance

6.1. Introduction
6.2. Changes in food regimes
6.3. The organization of food governance
6.4. Processes of food governance: hegemonic mediation & the Canadian listeriosis outbreak of 2008
6.4.1. Hegemonic mediation and the organization of food governance in Canada
6.4.2. The listeriosis outbreak
6.4.3. Some characteristics of listeria and listeriosis
6.4.4. Reactions to the outbreak
6.4.5. Managing the situation
6.5. Conclusion
6.6. Notes on readings

7. Conclusion

8. References

Module 3: Research Methods

1. Introduction

2. Research Defined

2.1. Social Research
2.1.1. Neutrality and bias in social research

3. Research Question

4. Research Design

4.1. Research Process Checklist

5. Research Methods

5.1. Case Study
5.2. Literature Review
5.3. Survey
5.4. Sampling
5.5. Question Design
5.6. Institutional Ethnography: Research for (rather than about) farmers

6. Terminology

6.1. Glossary of Key Terms

7. Academic Integrity in Research

7.1. Quoting and Paraphrasing
7.2. Citations

8. Research at the UOC: Taking advantage of the library

8.1. List of Useful Journals
8.2. Organising your References and Citations
8.3. Ethics

9. Common Errors in Research

10. Conclusion

11. References

Module 4: Contemporary Issues in Food Studies

1. Introduction

1.1. Living systems are complex
1.2. Unpredictability as a source of creation
1.3. Peripheries, networks, democracy

2. Integrated systems and linear systems in relationship to different production and distribution models in agriculture

2.1. Industrial agriculture as a linear system
2.2. Traditional agriculture as an integrated system
2.3. Different ways of buying and selling

3. Intellectual property over scientific knowledge: the open source model and the wiki mode applied to agriculture

3.1. Inventing or discovering
3.1.1. Patents on life
3.2. Protecting Agricultural Heritage
3.2.1. The “protection” of plant varieties
3.3. Traditional agriculture is open source
3.4. Traditional breeding is wiki

4. Traditional knowledge

4.1. What is it?
4.2. Why is it important?
4.3. What is threatening traditional knowledge?
4.4. What can it be used for?
4.5. How can it be saved?
4.5.1. A Case of Knowledge to Protect: The GRANOS Project
4.5.1.1. How did the idea of GranOS originate?
4.5.1.2. What is GranOS for?
4.5.1.3. What will GranOS describe?
4.5.1.4. What do we mean by protection and what do we want to protect from?
4.5.1.5. Why Open Source?

5. The gift civilisation: the economics of abundance and the economics of scarcity

5.1. The unbalanced stability of societies without money
5.2. Classical economics and scarcity
5.3. Nature deals with abundance
5.4. Common goods

6. Universal laws and the ethical market: why Immanuel Kant wouldn't have eaten at McDonald's

6.1. When behaviours are “right”?
6.2. How much does food cost?
6.3. The role of informed consumers in changing the rules

7. Agriculture and gender knowledge

7.1. Women and traditional agriculture
7.2. Industrial agriculture without women
7.3. Women as social indicators

8. Evolution and co-evolution: cultural transmission as a complement to and substitute for evolution

8.1. Evolving to survive
8.2. Food-culture transmission

9. Seeds as a core issue of agriculture and the greatest divide between different visions

9.1. Seeds and identity
9.2. Seeds and food sovereignty
9.3. Seeds and intellectual property
9.4. Seeds and market
9.5. Seeds and research
9.6. The imaginary pros and the many actual cons of GMOs
9.7. Seeds and production
9.7.1. A Case of Action for Biodiversity: The Slow Food Movement

10. Bibliography

Learning resources

Materials will be in English and will include written course materials, relevant websites, academic articles, books and magazine articles, among others.

Next enrolment

June 2018

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